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New Issue – Volume 13 Issue 9 – Performance Horse Digest

Performance Horse Digest, Volume 13 Issue 9

Performance Horse Digest, Volume 13 Issue 9

★ Performance Horse Digest ★ Tips for Novice to Serious Competitors ★ Featuring top trainers and competitors in the industry!

 

Performance Horse Digest – Whether you’re subscribed to the print version or not, you can view the magazine online completely for free on your iPad, iPhone, Android, or any other mobile device or laptop.

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Performance Horse Digest – Featuring: Al Dunning, Pat Parelli, Clinton Anderson, Martha Josey, Lynn Palm, Craig Cameron, Richard Winters, Mike Major, Barbra Schulte, Sandy Collier, Monty Bruce, Dick Pieper, Dr. Robert M. Miller, Dr. Juliet M. Getty, and more! LEARN FROM THE PROS!

Table of Contents

FEATURED ARTICLE

by Abigail Boatwright
Sarah Dawson’s Snaffle Bit Futurity win on Selvarey was a product of good breeding—for horse and for rider.
 
by Al Dunning
The best trainers are thoughtful of the horse and how he works functionally. There are days when I can’t stop thinking about how I am going to ride the horse that I just got off of the next day.
 
by Chevy (Siobhan) Allen
After 4 years of applying, I was selected to be a Volunteer Roundup Rider for the Annual Custer State Park Buffalo Roundup!
 
by Doug Lindgren
One week ago, I was invited to help with a gather and branding at the Arivaipa Ranch. This ranch is where acquired my Spanish Barb, Bill.
 
by David Slipka
It is in our moments of struggle that define us. Those people that can do, do. Those that can’t complain. That is no secret to hard work.
 
by Martha Josey
Everyone takes training their performance horse seriously. I would like to talk about another part of that training that often gets overlooked: making sure your horse is ready for all arenas and all conditions.
 
by Harlan R. Anderson, DVM
I have many times said A Pound is always A Pound, but A Bale is not always A Bale.
 
by Richard Winters
I recently picked up a vintage horsemanship magazine from 1968. One of the articles described the training required of reining horses.
 
by Barbra Schulte
What does flexing your horse mean to you? There are lots of ways people apply this idea of flexing to their personal style of riding.
 
by Clinton Anderson
Mouthy horses are like little kids; they’ve got nothing to do and all day to do it in.
 
by Julie I. Fershtman
The stallion’s show or race schedule prevents its availability for breeding by cooled semen or live cover.
 
by Craig Cameron
Many horses react to correction quickly, and no further action on the handler’s part is necessary. Others need a little more firmness.
 
by Dennis Cappel
One of the most basic of aspects within horsemanship in any riding discipline, is that in order to ride you
first must get on them.
 
by Robert M. Miller, DVM
There is never a time without problems. That’s life. However, some of our primary problems are unique.
 
by Mike Major
There’s no reason you can’t side-pass your horse if you’ve taught him to flex his head, move his shoulders and hips, and gather himself when you pick up the reins.
 
by Lynn Palm
Any time you are getting into a different discipline, it is important to know what tack is allowed in competition.
 
by Sandy Collier
The 360-degree pivot on the hind end is the start of what will eventually be your spin, so a correct foundation is extremely important.
 
by Dick Pieper
Once my horse’s responses for speed are established in the circles, I can apply these same principles in other places.
 
SPECIAL SECTIONS
 
by Benjamin Espy, DVM, DACT
 
 

 

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